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Larks’ Tongues in Aspic (King Crimson, 1973) 6 September 2008

Posted by Basilios in King Crimson, Music Reviews.
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After releasing the previously reviewed In The Wake Of Poseidon, King Crimson lost those members with the greatest songwriting talent. The group found itself directionless from a creative point of view, and did what directionless groups do: drift. After a couple of not really good albums (Lizard and Islands, which I have but am not interested in reviewing at the moment, to be honest), the group finally collapsed.

Thus ended King Crimson, Phase 1; but that was not going to stop group leader Robert Fripp for very long. After a couple of years he assembled another group to raise the King Crimson standard, and set forth to create more innovative music; Phase 2 had begun. Once again, he picked very good musicians: bassist John Wetton (later of Asia), violinist David Cross, drummer Bill Bruford (earlier of Yes), and genial percussionist Jamie Muir.

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Green River (CCR, 1969) 8 October 2007

Posted by Basilios in CCR, Music Reviews.
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Green River

Green River was third album for CCR here, and the second the band released in 1969, after Bayou Country and before Willy And The Poor Boys. 1969 was the annus mirabilis for Creedence, or rather, for John Fogerty, whose songwriting skills grew, developed and matured. This second album is an important milestone, and even if it’s not the best CCR released, it shows the group’s promise, and it’s certainly enjoyable on its own right.

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Bayou Country (CCR, 1969) 26 September 2007

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Time to introduce a new group! And I picked Creedence Clearwater Revival, to the delight of a mate of mine; as famous and renowned as they are, in my opinion they don’t get the fame and credit they deserve, thus matching my criterion for reviews. The album I will review this time is their second, Bayou Country. Right from the start, even from the album title, they establish their fictional image of a bunch of poor artists from the Deep South of the USA. Well, they’re not. They’re from California, but the Deep South is the inspiration of much of their musical choices, that can’t be denied. And nobody like CCR was going to be able to take the best of the American South and distill it in poppy, friendly albums. (more…)

Reggatta De Blanc (The Police, 1979) 16 August 2007

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Reggatta De Blanc was the second album The Police released. In a way, it’s quite similar to the previous one (reviewed here), sticking as it does to the same formula: a collection of well played pop songs, some of them with slight infusions of reggae elements. But this is not just Outlandos D’Amour vol 2: the band has really gelled together, playing much more tightly, and there are fewer reggae influences, fewer love songs, and more pop. In fact, Sting here takes his first step towards the poppy, smooth and occasionally boring style he’d adopt in his solo career. (more…)

Da Capo (Love, 1967) 1 July 2007

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Da Capo was the second album released by American band Love. Like virtually all other Love albums, this was another flop; but unlike them, one of the songs here, Seven And Seven Is, became a minor hit, peaking at the 33th position. This success, albeit limited, gave the group enough oxygen to continue its career, which would reach its qualitative peak with Forever Changes, the successor to this album, and one that, despite having no hit singles and no relevant sales to speak of, is more critically appreciated today. (more…)